Photo by Claire Dumont, Nepal Semester.

Nepal Educator

Leadership in Global Education

A Skills-Based Training Seminar for Educators Exploring Cultural Survival and Learning Service

Enroll
Duration
15 Days
Description

An immersive professional development seminar in field and classroom-based global education for teachers of global studies, world religions, and for coordinators of international and community-engagement programs.

Dates

Aug 1 - Aug 15, 2019


Suggested Ages

All ages

Number of Participants

12


Availability

Open

Begins In

14 Weeks

Tuition

$2,850


Estimated Flight Cost

$1,975

POKHARA

Kathmandu

Patan

Program Overview


This course is both a training in best practices focused on access to best learning opportunities, and student facilitation strategies, as well as an experiential exposure to critical global issues. Join veteran instructor Claire Bennett on an encounter with the people, stories and traditions of this magical Himalayan kingdom.

Tucked amidst the colossal peaks of the Himalaya, the Kathmandu Valley is an ancient crossroads of Himalayan trade and is a melting pot of cultures, creating a convergence of deep traditions amid the bustle of modern South Asian life. On this global educators seminar, educators examine key global issues related to present-day development, environmental sustainability, and cultural survival. In the medieval UNESCO World Heritage site of Bhaktapur, we examine the Newar lineage of pottery, weaving and woodcarving and explore topics of urban planning and sacred space through talks on the spiritual and religious dimensions of Hinduism, Buddhism and Shamanism. In Patan,…

This course is both a training in best practices focused on access to best learning opportunities, and student facilitation strategies, as well as an experiential exposure to critical global issues. Join veteran instructor Claire Bennett on an encounter with the people, stories and traditions of this magical Himalayan kingdom.

Tucked amidst the colossal peaks of the Himalaya, the Kathmandu Valley is an ancient crossroads of Himalayan trade and is a melting pot of cultures, creating a convergence of deep traditions amid the bustle of modern South Asian life. On this global educators seminar, educators examine key global issues related to present-day development, environmental sustainability, and cultural survival. In the medieval UNESCO World Heritage site of Bhaktapur, we examine the Newar lineage of pottery, weaving and woodcarving and explore topics of urban planning and sacred space through talks on the spiritual and religious dimensions of Hinduism, Buddhism and Shamanism. In Patan, “the city of beauty,” we live with Newari families while we engage with a women’s cooperative, meet United Nations officials, and discuss the Valley’s history with local elders. Examining the word itself, and peeling back the layers of “development,” we better understand Nepal, and South Asia in general, as it transitions from an ancient Kingdom to a modern nation. Experiential activities include introduction to Buddhist tradition through guided meditation practice, light hiking in the Himalaya foothills, and walks amid prominent cultural heritage sites with world-renown scholars. Global educators get real world exposure to contemporary issues in religious and cultural studies, sustainable development, and the arts, while also developing teaching tools to effectively address these themes in the classroom back home.

Since first working with Dragons in 2009, Claire has logged over 1,000 field-days working with students. Moreover, her ongoing work on community-based, grass-roots development, combined with her love of the people and communities in which you will engage, ensure participants a deep and authentic relationship with place. Participants on this program are bound to not just learn, but to also have a remarkably good time. Please join us in Nepal!

Read More Read Less Sample Itinerary

This Global Educators Course benefits from Dragons’ extensive student study abroad in Nepal, including our popular Himalayan Studies semester for gap year and college students and our Nepal summer abroad program for high school students.

Training Modules Include:
  • Risk Management: how to identify, assess, and manage risks abroad; working with students to manage risk in the field; the student-container – check-ins, documentation, and student management
  • Learning Service: Increasing numbers of young people are looking for outlets for “doing good in the world”, but in traditional service-learning experiences, who is serving who? This course dives deep into the philosophy of “learning service” that Dragons has as a core component in all its programs, exploring how successful service to others rests on how open you are to learning prior to and during any time spent volunteering, and how educators have unique opportunities to embed this in the curriculum.
  • Student Engagement: how to deepen the student experience through intentional facilitation; teaching to global leadership and awareness; working with a progression that allows students to fail forward; bookending your program – tone-setting an experience and integrating a program into the rest of a students’ life; ethnocentrism and cultural awareness
  • Access to Best Learning Opportunities: how to build sustainable relationships with host communities; facilitating a homestay safely; organizing a student excursion; setting up a successful service-learning project
Additional Topics May Include:
  • Buddhism, Hinduism and Religious Syncretism: A peaceful coexistence of Hinduism and Buddhism is the sticking feature of Nepal. What historical processes spiritual practices have led to the syncretic versions of spirituality witnessed in Nepal today? What features of these religions helps to explain how the country avoided religious conflict, and what role does shamanism play in shaping Nepalese versions of Hinduism and Buddhism? How does the iconography of these religions define the national identity, and fuel international tourism?
  • Sustainable Development and Cultural Survival: How can indigenous relations to land promote a mutually beneficial agenda for economic development through eco-tourism? In what way has cultural identity been commodified to increase international tourism? How have businesses and governments appropriated cultural identity towards developing the tourism industry? How do indigenous rights claims affect transnational and governmental economic development strategies? How have different groups been successful at campaigning for cultural rights and continuity at the state-level?