Photo by Riley Smith, Jordan Summer Program.

Jordan Educator

Teaching Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues

A 9-Day Seminar for Global Educators

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Duration
9 Days
Description

A seminar for global educators, school administrators and teachers of history, religion, Arabic, and social studies. We explore the tensions between historical and modern identities in the Middle East.

Dates

Mar 23 - Apr 1, 2018


Suggested Ages

All ages

Number of Participants

12


Availability

open

Begins In

27 Weeks

Tuition

$2,590


Estimated Flight Cost

$2,175

Madaba

AMMAN

WADI RUM

Petra

Program Overview

Sleep under the desert stars in bedouin camps, immerse in rural home-stays, and visit with leading activists on complex global issues.


From the cradle of civilization to headlines fronting today’s news media, Jordan and the Levant represent a deep and storied culture that is often maligned and is little understood. In one of the world’s most significant geo-political regions, our Seminar for Global Educators participants focus on current perceptions of Arab identity and the influence of non-Arab actors that followed the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire. Through home-stays, meetings with community leaders and directors of NGOs, primary source readings and case studies of recent diplomatic problems, educators examine issues such as gender roles and identity, cultural change and transformation, and the management of valuable natural resources such as oil, water, land and sun. A special focus is given to the perceptions behind current regional conflicts and the potential for creating lasting peace in the region. How does one’s home-stay father find hope amidst conflict? How is Islam related to Judaism and Christianity…

From the cradle of civilization to headlines fronting today’s news media, Jordan and the Levant represent a deep and storied culture that is often maligned and is little understood. In one of the world’s most significant geo-political regions, our Seminar for Global Educators participants focus on current perceptions of Arab identity and the influence of non-Arab actors that followed the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire. Through home-stays, meetings with community leaders and directors of NGOs, primary source readings and case studies of recent diplomatic problems, educators examine issues such as gender roles and identity, cultural change and transformation, and the management of valuable natural resources such as oil, water, land and sun. A special focus is given to the perceptions behind current regional conflicts and the potential for creating lasting peace in the region. How does one’s home-stay father find hope amidst conflict? How is Islam related to Judaism and Christianity as an Abrahamic faith? How are farmers in the area reaching across political and religious lines to propose a rapid, peaceful solution? Our Jordan Educator participants return to the classroom with lessons and stories of personal connection, replacing stolid stereotypes with a fresh, authentic and human connection to the people of the Middle East.

Read More Read Less Sample Itinerary

Topics Include:

  • Contemporary History of Land Rights and Resource Management: Jordan’s important geographic location has caused land to change hands since antiquity. How do political agendas, ethnic claims, land-use practices, and resource management strategies determine who has rights and access to scarce and valuable resources? How are environmental challenges exacerbated by the scarcity of water supply, deterioration of water resources, land contamination, desertification, mismanagement of land use and air pollution.
  • Inter-Ethnic Conflict and Cultural Identity: How have Christian, Muslim and Judaeic identity affected settlement patterns, political structures, and domestic as well as regional conflict? What are the markers of identity that determine one’s cultural identity and how are diverse groups differentiating themselves from the “other”? Who is claiming Indigenous status and what sway do indigenous rights play in land disputes and conflict?
  • Issues of Gender: What are the dynamics of women’s civil and political rights in Jordan, with specific emphasis on the legal and institutional framework and its implication for gender equality and women’s empowerment? How does the conversation around gender equality compare to Western norms? What are the comparative differences between urban and rural perspectives on this topic?
  • Peace-Building Strategies: What is the scope of peace-building in Jordan in relation to conflict prevention and humanitarian and development assistance? How has international and women’s participation played a role? How does Jordan factor into the “Arab Spring?”
  • Cultural Survival and Modernity: In the past decade, tourism and associated development has greatly increased, attracting investment capital and a cognizance of the need for harmony between economic development and heritage preservation. Will the rights, economic future, and the dignity of the indigenous populations be equally assured? How can Bedouin groups navigate the inherent tension between being a “traditional people” in “modern times”?