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    [post_content] => Dear Benjamin and fellow students,

Thanks for posting an introduction, and for your question!  Yes, the sticker affixed in your passport is our Bolivian tourist visa.  The photos you submitted are saved by the consulate for administrative purposes.

By now, all students should have received or soon be receiving their tourist visas.  Thank you for your attention to this, and for your patience if you encountered difficulties along the way!  If anyone has any other questions about visas - or anything at all - please feel free to post as it's likely that others have the same questions.  This is a space to post queries and begin to build community as a group, so post away!

Best wishes,

Julianne
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FALL: Andes & Amazon A

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Response to Benjamin’s visa questions

Julianne Chandler,FALL: Andes & Amazon A

Description

Dear Benjamin and fellow students, Thanks for posting an introduction, and for your question!  Yes, the sticker affixed in your passport is our Bolivian tourist visa.  The photos you submitted are saved by the consulate for administrative purposes. By now, all students should have received or soon be receiving their tourist visas.  Thank you for […]

Posted On

08/24/16

Author

Julianne Chandler

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    [post_date] => 2016-08-24 09:33:37
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    [post_content] => Hi all,

I just received my passport which was returned from the Bolivian embassy, and my passport now has a sticker from the embassy in it with stamps, a signature, etc. Is this my visa? I just want to make sure that this is correct/ all I need, since I was assuming that it would be something more like my passport since we had to submit photos in order to apply.

Thanks!

Benjamin Swift
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FALL: Andes & Amazon A

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Visa Question

Benjamin Swift,FALL: Andes & Amazon A

Description

Hi all, I just received my passport which was returned from the Bolivian embassy, and my passport now has a sticker from the embassy in it with stamps, a signature, etc. Is this my visa? I just want to make sure that this is correct/ all I need, since I was assuming that it would […]

Posted On

08/24/16

Author

Benjamin Swift

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    [post_content] => ¡Hola! My name is Benjamin Swift, and I am SO excited to join all of you in just a few weeks for what I'm certain will be an incredible and transformative adventure.

I'm really looking forward to getting to know you all in person on course, and I thought I'd start out by introducing myself here. I just graduated from high school in Crested Butte, Colorado, and I've deferred enrollment at Colorado College to take a gap year starting with Dragons! Crested Butte is a tiny mountain town nestled in the Rockies at 9,000 feet, and here I have learned to love gallivanting in the mountains, whether it's climbing Colorado's 14ers (peaks over 14,000 feet in elevation), mountain biking, running, skiing (I love to telemark and Nordic ski), backpacking, and other outdoorsy athletic activities. My love for the outdoors is what led me to choose this specific Dragons course, as it combines a longer trekking component with the fascinating culture of the region and with Spanish language immersion (which is important to me since I've had Spanish all throughout school, and this is my opportunity to become truly fluent via immersion).

I chose Where There Be Dragons because of their commitment to cultural immersion and cross-cultural education; I have traveled to several countries outside of the U.S., but in these experiences I have always to some extent been a tourist, an outsider. I crave the opportunity to explore Bolivia and Peru as a traveler, to live as the local families do, to experience a more authentic version of these countries. I think that cultural literacy is essential to a healthy society, and if only more people would venture outside of their comfort zones with an open mind and strive to embrace and understand other ways of thinking and living, the world would be more peaceful, more empathetic, more community-minded.

I want to go into my course free of expectations and subject to whatever meaningful experiences that I am fortunate enough to engage in. Nevertheless, I have several general goals, and my biggest goal is to understand the Bolivian and Peruvian people with whom we interact as an insider. I think the relationships  that we develop, both among ourselves as students and instructors, and with the locals we meet, will be an invaluable component to this course, so I aim to make the most of these relationships by asking questions and exploring the communities we visit. Of course, I hope to emerge more fluent in Spanish as well.

I'm currently reading Che Guevara's Motorcycle Diaries, which is an entertaining and insightful account of his travels through South America. I'm also reading One River by Wade Davis and the Dignity and Defiance book that Dragons sent us; both of which are interesting.

For the past three summers I've been studying mayflies with scientists at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory near Crested Butte, so I can be our on-course mayfly expert :-) ! We study aquatic mayfly larvae which become parasitized by a nematode worm which has a feminizing effect—it turns all infected male mayflies into females (changing both their appearances and their behavior to be like those of a female)! This transformation happens because when the mayflies emerge as terrestrial adults, they live for a couple days and mate, and if they're female (or if they think they're females), they return to the stream to lay their eggs, but if they're males, they don't necessarily return to the water. The worm needs to return to the stream to complete its life cycle so—obvious solution—it turns its host into a female! I've really enjoyed studying mayflies, and I'm thinking maybe about studying biology in college. I'm also really interested in and involved with environmental advocacy/environmental science, videography, and lots of other things (like how the other night I decided that maybe I'll major in English too in college, because why not?).

I can't wait to meet you all in Miami and to learn more about you through Field Notes! ¡Hasta Pronto!

Benjamin Swift

P.S. I'm hoping to go for runs while on course. Any fellow runners out there?
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¡Hola Amigos! Benjamin Swift Student Introduction

Benjamin Swift,FALL: Andes & Amazon A

Description

¡Hola! My name is Benjamin Swift, and I am SO excited to join all of you in just a few weeks for what I’m certain will be an incredible and transformative adventure. I’m really looking forward to getting to know you all in person on course, and I thought I’d start out by introducing myself here. I […]

Posted On

08/24/16

Author

Benjamin Swift

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    [post_content] => Hola a todos! Not totally sure I am doing this correctly, but here goes my first Field Notes post.

 

Intro:

I’m Ethan, and I’ve lived in Wyoming, Ohio almost all of my life. (For the record, Wyoming the city existed before Wyoming the state.) I love history, politics, and the arts. When I am not reading news and Wikipedia articles on subjects ranging from the ancient Greeks to the functioning of the our Congress, I love to play trombone, participate in musical theater, and do Model UN. I have always been fascinated by other cultures. My favorite school subject is history, because I find it compelling to learn about the rituals and customs of societies throughout the world – how people from antiquity to the present made their lives meaningful. For this reason, I am incredibly excited to meaningfully experience the culture of a society I’ve only read and studied about previously, whether that be by participating in religious holidays with my homestay family (no doubt different from my familiar Passover's and Rosh Hashanah's) or learning to play Andean wind instruments. I strongly feel that diversity of experience leads to greater empathy and efficacy in creating change. I am thrilled and grateful to have the opportunity through the Bridge Year Program to undertake this journey of cultural discovery and personal understanding.

 

Holmberg's Mistake Reflection:

I found this article super interesting; I love to read about history and especially ancient civilizations. What I find most interesting is discovering how these civilizations were advanced for their time - how, for example, the Olmecs and the Maya were “world pioneers in mathematics and astronomy,” or how Tiwanaku had a population that Paris would only achieve five hundred years later. I think that through understanding the intellectual and structural achievements of these pre-Columbian civilizations, we can bridge the gap between our untrue but still believed-in “Holmberg” versions of Native American history and the incredible feats that Native Americans accomplished. It’s definitely hard for me to shake my preconceived notions. For one, kindergarten and elementary school history education seem to rely heavily on the idea of Native Americans as “Noble Savage[s],” who peacefully inhabited the Americas with no environmental impact. While I think this way of thinking is preferable to teaching kids that Native Americans were dangerous barbarians, the Noble Savage idea denies pre-Columbian Native Americans fundamental human qualities - the capacity for ambition, intellectualism, and conflict. Another reason it is difficult to let go my implicit biases towards Native Americans is that the conquest by the Spanish, Portuguese and British and their spreading of diseases destroyed so much of the pre-Columbian civilization. It’s impossible to understand the achievements of pre-Columbian civilizations if you don’t also learn about the forces that tried to bury and erase their existence.

This is at least what I’ve learned in class, but I am eager to learn about these forces’ impact on Bolivians themselves. I don’t think you can fully appreciate someone’s fundamental humanity until you meet them face to face.

 

My Bolivian Food: Silpancho

The Bolivian food I chose to write about is “silpancho,” a popular food from Cochabamba. It consists of, from the bottom layer up, rice, potatoes, meat, chopped tomatoes, and a mixture of onion, beet, and parsley with an egg on top. The meat is thin, like schnitzel, and can be ground or pounded to achieve the desired thickness. In addition, the onion, beet, and parsley are sometimes substituted for pico de gallo, which is salsa of tomatoes, onions, fresh hot peppers, coriander leaves, salt, and lime juice. My Bolivian-American friend Monica suggested that I write about silpancho, as it's her favorite dish. A Google search of silpancho returns 54,600 results and many, many recipes, while a search of #silpancho on Twitter contains many exclamations about a delicious meal. People in Bolivia seem to enjoy this food on special occasions, such as Father’s Day and Valentine’s Day, while Bolivians outside their country eat this for a taste of home. Finally, according to Chavo Salvatierra on Twitter, a meal of silpancho requires 60 km of biking to burn off.

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Princeton Bridge Year: Bolivia 2016-17

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Intro, Holmberg’s Mistake, and my Bolivian Food

Ethan Kahn,Princeton Bridge Year: Bolivia 2016-17

Description

Hola a todos! Not totally sure I am doing this correctly, but here goes my first Field Notes post.   Intro: I’m Ethan, and I’ve lived in Wyoming, Ohio almost all of my life. (For the record, Wyoming the city existed before Wyoming the state.) I love history, politics, and the arts. When I am […]

Posted On

08/24/16

Author

Ethan Kahn

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    [post_content] => Hey everyone! My name is Jackson and I am from a small town on the coast of Maine. Much of what motivated me to pursue the Bridge Year Program is a result of the rural environment and close-knit community that I have known my entire life. I grew up hiking, fishing, swimming, and taking part in every athletic activity that I could find. Through those endeavors, I have developed a love for the outdoors and the natural world. So to see the vibrant and varied ecosystems that Bolivia has to offer, to hear about the close connection that the Andean peoples have with Pachamama, and to traverse the imposing landscapes of the Andes, will be a dream come true for me. Additionally, up to this point my perception of service stems from my experiences in a small town where everyone knows everyone. So a goal of mine during this experience is to broaden how I view service, and I think that living and doing service work in Tiquipaya and throughout Bolivia will help me to do just that. I'm used to attempting to bring positive change to my community, which I'm familiar with, but I hope that immersing myself in this new environment will lead me toward helping people in the global community, no matter the location. Lastly, I have always enjoyed my time learning the Spanish language, and I'm excited to increase my knowledge of the language as the year goes on. Who knows? Maybe I'll pick up some Quechua in the process! I can't wait to meet everyone and get started!
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Princeton Bridge Year: Bolivia 2016-17

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Intro

Jackson Vail,Princeton Bridge Year: Bolivia 2016-17

Description

Hey everyone! My name is Jackson and I am from a small town on the coast of Maine. Much of what motivated me to pursue the Bridge Year Program is a result of the rural environment and close-knit community that I have known my entire life. I grew up hiking, fishing, swimming, and taking part […]

Posted On

08/24/16

Author

Jackson Vail

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    [post_date] => 2016-08-24 08:22:24
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    [post_content] => Hey everyone,

My name is Jason and I'm from Marin County, California, just north of San Francisco. I am just finishing up my last preparations for this journey and I couldn't be more excited.

I grew up in the Bay Area with a brother, a stepbrother, and a stepsister. I have been a musician since I can remember, starting on piano and moving to trumpet in middle school. In high school, my life revolved around music. I was always running from one rehearsal to another, somehow fitting homework in there somewhere. I play mostly jazz, but I have some experience in funk, rock, and salsa. Otherwise, I did slam poetry and some creative writing.

My goals for the program are manifold. Firstly, I would like to set a precedent of service and humility for my life. What better way to do that than BYP? Secondly, I think Bridge Year will be the perfect precursor to my Princeton experience. I'm sure it will influence the classes I take and the friends I make. Lastly, I want to observe activism on the ground. Bolivia is ground zero for many of the human rights issues I am most interested in, so I'm sure what I see and feel there will provide invaluable context for whatever service I continue on to do.

I can't wait to see you all at Princeton this weekend!

Jason Seavey
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Princeton Bridge Year: Bolivia 2016-17

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Introduction

Jason Seavey,Princeton Bridge Year: Bolivia 2016-17

Description

Hey everyone, My name is Jason and I’m from Marin County, California, just north of San Francisco. I am just finishing up my last preparations for this journey and I couldn’t be more excited. I grew up in the Bay Area with a brother, a stepbrother, and a stepsister. I have been a musician since […]

Posted On

08/24/16

Author

Jason Seavey

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    [post_content] => Holiday traditions have always played a major role in my family, especially the ones that involve food, because its a chance for us to celebrate, eat and just be together. So, it is fascinating for me to learn the role that buñuelos play in Bolivian culture, as they are a staple on Christmas mornings in many parts of the country.  Rolled into dough, then flattened, fried, and served with syrup, buñuelos are a simple yet delicious-looking pastry resembling an American doughnut. While I do admit to being quite the doughnut fan, its not the taste of the buñuelos that interests me, but their significance to the Bolivian people. Remembering the "breakfast casserole" that I would typically eat on Christmas mornings with my American family,  having the opportunity to try a freshly made buñuelo, and to celebrate, eat, and just be together with my Bolivian family would give me an unhindered view of what it means to be a Bolivian, and I can't wait to give it a try.
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Buñuelos

Jackson Vail,Princeton Bridge Year: Bolivia 2016-17

Description

Holiday traditions have always played a major role in my family, especially the ones that involve food, because its a chance for us to celebrate, eat and just be together. So, it is fascinating for me to learn the role that buñuelos play in Bolivian culture, as they are a staple on Christmas mornings in […]

Posted On

08/24/16

Author

Jackson Vail

WP_Post Object
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    [post_author] => 16
    [post_date] => 2016-08-23 19:52:59
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    [post_content] => 

Hello dear students!

Every semester we receive lots of questions about bringing smart phones, smart watches, GoogleGlasses (ok, maybe not GoogleGlasses…is that still a thing?). Dragons as an organization has a blanket policy that strongly requests all students to leave smartphones at home. You can read more about that in your materials, but in short, we’ve found phones detract from the experience and can create risk management issues for the group. A past instructor that was living in Bolivia, said that the best time in-country happened after her phone broke; she could finally “unplug” and be present with her surroundings, freed from the expectation and temptation to keep a close pulse on life back home. Please carefully read and consider what Dragons has written about smart phones. Here is what you need to know for our Andes and Amazon program…

We want to challenge you to keep your devices at home. It is amazing how dependent we’ve all become on technology and Peru and Bolivia might provide one of the few opportunities for you to “unplug” from the pressures of constant social media/electronic connection. It is a truly liberating feeling if you haven’t tried it, or don’t remember the last time you didn’t have a phone at arm’s reach. We encourage everyone to please read this article from the NY Times. It’s not the same “technology is corrupting our youth” judgmental piece you’ve seen before, but has some really thoughtful insights on how technology can most affect our ability to be alone. We’d love to hear your thoughts on it. All that said, we also know that every semester, no matter how much we emphasize it, a few students still show up with devices. And heck, we love music and information access too, so we get it…no one here is “anti-technology” (we have to carry our phones with us for communication purposes). So here we are, kindly asking you again to please leave your devices at home and also reminding that if you do bring a smartphone/mp3 player with you we ask that you be honest with us; there is no judgment, but we want to be fair and consistent with all students. We will collect and store any devices (mp3 players, phones, etc) that distract from our presence in Peru and Bolivia, an assessment that we will make. What we do not want is for you to enter a home-stay, pop in your ear buds, and tune out of the experience around you. We’ve seen electronic devices completely tear students away from their present surroundings, increase home-sickness, and keep one foot in South America and one foot longing for their Snapchat or Instagram feed happening back home. Even our longest and most arduous travel days, precisely when it’s most tempting to put our headphones on, can hold some of the most amazing and unexpected cultural interactions; however, we need to keep our eyes and ears open (i.e., not looking at a screen or listening to music) to engage those unplanned moments. If you disregard this request and choose to bring an smartphone type device, do not plan to use it and know that instructors will likely hold on to any phones. Do not come with an international calling/date plan and do not plan to get a local SIM card. We know that this might be difficult for some, however there will be opportunities to use call centers and internet as the locals do to connect with important people at home. Don’t worry, those services are usually pretty accessible. As a group, we will have access to internet for Skype calls, emails, etc. about once a week. It will be an important goal for all of us to inform our loved ones at home of our travels. Dragons will also be posting on the website (notes from the field) about flight arrivals and departures. This will be a crucial way for those at home to follow our travels, know that we are safe, and hear about the topics we are being exposed to.

If your smartphone is your only camera, please bring a separate camera or be prepared to share photos; smart phones are not ideal as your primary camera and we don’t want to hear the “I need my phone because it’s my camera” line. We are going to be in dirty/wet/cold conditions, so don’t bring anything you wouldn’t be fine with losing, breaking, or having stolen. In sum, please leave your tech devices at home. If despite all this you do bring a phone along, please respect these expectations.

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FALL: Andes & Amazon A

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Get ready to unplug to plug into Peru and Bolivia!

Julianne Chandler,FALL: Andes & Amazon A

Description

Hello dear students! Every semester we receive lots of questions about bringing smart phones, smart watches, GoogleGlasses (ok, maybe not GoogleGlasses…is that still a thing?). Dragons as an organization has a blanket policy that strongly requests all students to leave smartphones at home. You can read more about that in your materials, but in short, […]

Posted On

08/23/16

Author

Julianne Chandler

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Hello fellow travelers, naga, and soon to be friends!

As I write this I am sitting in front of my wood stove sipping sweet and milky tea, pausing to tend the smoldering ashes beneath my freshly caught salmon smoking on the porch. It’s 55 degrees and raining from Alaska’s autumn gray skies. At this moment I’m perched high up on the world’s 59th parallel where I grew up—the air is deliciously cool and the light lingers long into the night. When I close my eyes I can bring myself back to the unrelenting heat, the myriad smells, and the constant squawk and bustle of Indonesia, but it feels, because it is, a world away.

Yet, here we all are; headed there soon. They’re complex, aren’t they, these moments of transition? Where we begin to prep our minds for change, rehearsing the logistics of the journey, guessing at what we might need to carry with us, who we might miss most, all the while thwarting back expectations and preconceptions to keep our minds clear and our hearts open?

A decade ago I stood in your shoes. Seventeen-years-old, with all the excitement of the unknown bubbling up from underneath the undeniable knot in my stomach, I teetered on the edge of adventure, like you, about to take the plunge.  In my case, the leap was a year as a high school exchange student in the ancient city of Istanbul, Turkey. Packing up my suitcase, I said goodbye to my small Alaskan hometown and ventured forth into the bustling streets of a city of 16 million. To this day, I maintain that my choice to learn and travel abroad at a young age was the best and most influential decision I have ever made. That choice, just like yours to venture to Indonesia this fall, opened my eyes to the power of cross-cultural connection, and instilled in me lessons of self-confidence, humility, and compassion that have guided and defined the rest of my life. I have no doubt that similar moments of wonder and small tokens of wisdom wait for you in the green hills of Flores and the blue seas of Sampela.

My trajectory from then until now has been as varied and circuitous as my interests. The love for people and cultures I discovered while traveling drew me to the study of History in college, as I strove to understand the world through its stories, but I have always harbored a great appreciation for the natural world. At the end of each school year, with a brain weary from learning, I would escape the hustle and bustle of New England and return home to Alaska to join family and friends in the commercial salmon fishery. There, afloat on the ocean, with salty lips and cracked hands, I was at peace. Working most recently as part of an all-women crew, I’ve spent 11 summers riding the currents along the remote shores of Alaska’s harsh and beautiful coastline harvesting its rich and vibrant wild resources.

After my college graduation, I was awarded a Watson Fellowship, a grant that allowed me to combine my passions, and explore my love for the ocean, its power and its people, in places new to me. In 2012 I voyaged to the remote shores of New Zealand, Madagascar, Northern Norway, the Faroe Islands, and finally, Indonesia. It was the latter, abuzz with mystery, which captured my curiosity and my heart. In Indonesia I found myriad languages, religions, ethnicities, and traditions jumbled and perched upon thousands of islands, surrounded, separated, and intertwined by the sea. It was complex. It was fascinating. I was hooked.

This past summer I was lucky enough to join the Dragons team and return to this magical corner of the world. Needless to say, Micah, Rita and I are thrilled at the chance to learn with you this fall in this vibrant and verdant archipelago. To dig deep below the surface, to ask the hard questions, and engage with the ambiguity of their answers. To encounter the warmhearted people, the curious creatures, and the age-old stories, which make this watery corner of the world so unique. I hope to meet you there with wide-eyes, curious minds, and open hearts. I promise you, we will find treasures to fill them all.

Sampai jumpa di Indonesia,

Lindsay

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Words of Welcome: From North to South

Lindsay Olsen,FALL: Indonesia: Community, Culture, & Conservation

Description

Hello fellow travelers, naga, and soon to be friends! As I write this I am sitting in front of my wood stove sipping sweet and milky tea, pausing to tend the smoldering ashes beneath my freshly caught salmon smoking on the porch. It’s 55 degrees and raining from Alaska’s autumn gray skies. At this moment […]

Posted On

08/23/16

Author

Lindsay Olsen

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    [post_content] => Na'nga def? Mangi fi rekk!

Hello Dragons! Words cannot describe my excitement for these next few months as the days loom closer. I'm excited for cafe touba and omelette sandwiches, dance parties and soccer in the street, Wolof and Pulaar phrases and the smells and sounds of the market in Thies. I'm excited to meet all of you and learn your stories and share tapalapa bread as we create new memories together!

Before we dive into the fall, I want to introduce myself and my background! My interest in traveling started when I was young, growing up in Portland, Oregon. For a second income, my family hosted exchange students from all around the world and my passion for cross-cultural communication and travel was sparked. My actual travel experience didn't officially start until after high school when I was a student on Dragons' first ever gap year semester to West Africa! This was the catapult to the rest of my future, the inspiration for what was to come. And it is yet another reason I'm so thrilled to be a part of this fall's semester in hopes that it has the same impact on each of you! After my semester with Dragons, I decided to take two full Gap Years before going to school. Within that time, I continued to explore opportunities and other places, following my own interests and where the wind was blowing. I first spent two months in India teaching English and assisting teachers who are devoted to improving the education and accessibility to resources for students living in low-caste and poor communities. It was a challenging, insightful trip and a strong taste of real, hands-on development. Not long after, life brought me to Australia and New Zealand for several months, during which I worked on organic and non-organic farms, examining history and land practices, and learning how to surf. Between India and Oceania, I lived in Oregon, teaching outdoor education to youth from all over the Pacific Northwest. In my spare time, I was found either with my family or somewhere outside, exploring Oregon's trails, rivers, and forests and fostering my skills and love for outdoor adventure as well the experiences and stories of those met along the way.

After my double Gap Year, I returned home to Portland and attended Portland State University to study International Development with a focus in Africa and a double minor in French and Black Studies. During the summers, I continued to travel and explore my passions and more beautiful places, eager to learn and grow and ask questions and smell flowers from another soil. One summer took me to the Hawaiian islands where I worked on an organic farm and researched indigenous history and relationships with land, working with local Hawaiians to run a seed adoption program for Native Hawaiian plants and food. I walked away with valuable knowledge and lessons that no classroom could ever match. My last summer in school was spent in Latin America where I completed research for my thesis by teaching English and traveling, living with host families and making beautiful connections with land and people. I also continued to teach outdoor science education and outdoor survival skills to youth in Oregon in the summers I wasn't traveling. For several years in a row, I had the exciting opportunity to help develop and coordinate a travel camp program for lower-income teenagers in the Pacific Northwest where we explored leadership skills and outdoor adventure, and providing a rare, travel opportunity. This opportunity provided me with stronger leadership and life skills, reinforcing a love for working with youth in new, challenging, and inspiring ways. I graduated school with honors and an even stronger passion for cross-cultural experience, international travel, and the potential we have as global citizens to create change.

After finishing school in 2014, I had the pleasure of returning to West Africa with Global Leadership Adventures, a travel and volunteer-based program for high school students from around the world. I spent that summer in Ghana, facilitating lectures, programming, hikes, and community activities with GLA students, walking away feeling inspired and humbled at the hearts of people - students, locals, and friends encountered along the way. Last summer, I traveled to Tanzania with GLA, doing many similar activities and also exploring relationships that the Maasai have with the land in East Africa through safari and time spent with the Maasai. Working with GLA in Africa was a powerful learning experience and a significant way to engage with local communities and examine development and history. My time spent there also inspired me to continue to ask important questions and challenge my role as a global citizen in a time that is both politically and socially complex, taking time to engage in conversations with amazing individuals and participate in activities that are improving our world.

I am currently living in Juneau, Alaska where I am working for an outdoor education company and a non-profit organization that helps to support adults with developmental disabilities. I am also assisting in opening a brewery in town, although I am usually found hiking in the mountains that surround Juneau, kayaking, and exploring the trails with my dog! I love living in the mountains and the rainforest, but am eager to put my feet back onto Africa soil!

Senegal was where it all began for me, and it holds a special significance in my life. I can't wait to share it all with you in hopes that it also is a catapult in some ways, sparking questions and passions and future dreams. West Africa is the perfect place to learn a new language, experience teranga, or hospitality at its finest, examine difficult issues and ask difficult questions, explore history and development, connect with beautiful, friendly people, and make new, incredible memories as we grow and travel together.

Just like Angelica said, we are so looking forward to meeting each and every one of you. Feel free to introduce yourselves, post a note, let us know what you're looking forward to most! And let us know if you have any questions.

See you soon!

 

Laura
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Bonjour from Laura!

Laura Chase,Fall: West Africa

Description

Na’nga def? Mangi fi rekk! Hello Dragons! Words cannot describe my excitement for these next few months as the days loom closer. I’m excited for cafe touba and omelette sandwiches, dance parties and soccer in the street, Wolof and Pulaar phrases and the smells and sounds of the market in Thies. I’m excited to meet […]

Posted On

08/23/16

Author

Laura Chase

Where There Be Dragons on Instagram

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