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    [post_content] => This past Tuesday was my 19th birthday and I thought it might be nice to lay out what a typical day here in Jogjakarta looks like as well as detail a few of the nice things my host family and the Dragons group did to celebrate with me.

6am: I woke up to my 8 year old host brother Milfa's Malaysian cartoons playing in the room next door followed by his excited knocks on my door. After that, I ate the typical breakfast of nasi (rice), tempeh, and spinach (dayam).
7am: Milfa and Ualia (who is 14) both start school at 6:30 so at 7 me and my friend Emily were free to take a jog around the neighborhood. Notable sights during our run included but were not limited to a man herding his ducks down the street with remarkable precision, the students from the local airplane university headed to school in their pristine uniforms, farmers out harvesting rice, and parents taking their hijab clad toddlers to school on the back of their motorcycles.
7:30am: Time for the first mandi (shower) of the day! Here this involves dumping a bucket of cold water over our heads until we eventually manage to wash out all the shampoo.
8:15am: Emily, Sundi, and I all live in the same neighborhood and bike together to the Dragons program house for language classes everyday. Here it's vital to keep all the way to the left to avoid passing busses, cars, motorcycles, bicycles, and baceks (bicycle powered taxis). By the time we arrived, I had already become sweaty enough to warrant another quick mandi.
9am: Language classes
10:30am: Normally, this would be our morning meeting where we quickly go through how everyone's doing and discuss any necessary logistics, but instead I was greeted with a surprise Indonesian birthday tradition. Micah pulled me aside from the rest of the group and then when I wasn't looking they all came up behind me, cracked an egg on my head, then covered me in flour and water. Supposedly this is a long running Indonesian tradition and being the first one to have a birthday, I was the lucky subject.
11:30am: After another mandi to get all the food out of my hair, the rest of the group surprised me at a restaurant just down the street. We had a delicious lunch followed by chocolate birthday cake.
1pm: Tuesday was the first day of our ISPs (Independent Study Projects). Emily and I are both doing cooking so we met our teacher and headed off to the market downtown where we weaved through the multi stories and aisles to eventually find chicken, tempeh, and various spices and vegetables. The dried fish stall makes the whole building smell quite unpleasant; when you buy chicken you get to specify which parts you want as they chop the carcass up in front of you; vendors nap next to their stands waiting for customers.
2pm: We then returned to the program house to make massive meal consisting of vegetable coconut milk soup, spicy chicken curry, fried garlic tempeh, and nasi kuning (special yellow birhday rice).
5:30pm: Because I wanted to bring my birthday cake home to share with my host family, I decided to get a bacek back to my neighborhood. Unfortunately, given my severely limited language skills I couldn't really communicate with the driver and ended up overshooting the turn I was supposed to take. In addition, it had gotten dark in the time I was in the bacek so I suddenly couldn't recognize all of the familiar landmarks. Eventually, I managed to get a different bacek back in the opposite direction and mime my way to the airplane university in order to walk back home.
7pm: My host siblings and cousins were delighted by the cake and I spent the next few hours just sitting out on the porch talking (or attempting to talk) with the boys who go to the airplane university.
9pm: I took the final mandi of the day and read my book before reading my book going to bed.

Even though I didn't spend this birthday with any of the usual people, it was one of the best that I can remember.
    [post_title] => Selamat Ulang Tahun (Happy Birthday)
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FALL: Indonesia: Community, Culture, & Conservation

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Selamat Ulang Tahun (Happy Birthday)

Charlotte Driscoll,FALL: Indonesia: Community, Culture, & Conservation

Description

This past Tuesday was my 19th birthday and I thought it might be nice to lay out what a typical day here in Jogjakarta looks like as well as detail a few of the nice things my host family and the Dragons group did to celebrate with me. 6am: I woke up to my 8 […]

Posted On

09/30/16

Author

Charlotte Driscoll

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    [post_content] => While staying in the cooler highlands of Dieng, I went on a solo walk and stumbled upon an ancient landmark at the top of a long, meandering staircase that rose into the clouds. The following is an excerpt from my journal entry:

I am currently resting on the steps of a Hindu temple, enveloped in a cloud of fog that ebbs and flows with the gentle breeze. Tall, feathery trees surrounding the hill briefly blur from view, and as they gradually emerge, they stand in stark contrast to the stacked terraces in the distance. The fog meanders throughout the town below, where rows of lush vegetation give way to vibrant homes all squeezed together. The suns rays instantaneously escape from the clouds, illuminating flits of rain gently sprinkling to the ground. Within the temple, the entrances narrow stone walls frame my vision of Javanese farmers ambling through their fields. The polychromatic patchwork of rolling hills seem to emanate from the temple where I reside, as if it were the center of all in sight.

Switching my view from the sweeping landscape of Dieng to the interiors of the mysterious temple, I notice a dark, concentrated spot in the middle of the floor, where ceremonies and sacrifices are performed. Withered leaves and blackened candlewax spot the floor, signifying generations of tradition passed on. Gazing up toward the ceilng, mossy, earthy stones climb upwards, gradually tightening to form the top of the temple. Dozens of engravings in the stones tell the stories of Indonesians who have travelled here seeking refuge and spiritual liberation. Outside, the rain returns with renewed fervor, mixing the musty, floral scent of the temple with the rains fresh, earthy moisture.

Suddenly the afternoon prayer reverberates throughout Dieng, simultaneously eerie and calming. I once heard the prayer as a harsh cacophany of mosques, each indiviudally fighting to be heard. The prayer now sounds like a concert, each part unique, distinct, and yet unifying with the town life in harmony.
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Journal Entry

Emily Zislis,FALL: Indonesia: Community, Culture, & Conservation

Description

While staying in the cooler highlands of Dieng, I went on a solo walk and stumbled upon an ancient landmark at the top of a long, meandering staircase that rose into the clouds. The following is an excerpt from my journal entry: I am currently resting on the steps of a Hindu temple, enveloped in […]

Posted On

09/30/16

Author

Emily Zislis

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    [post_date] => 2016-09-29 14:24:26
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    [post_content] => September 16th, 2016.

As we left the guesthouse packed in two small vans, we waved our goodbyes to Aluo, his family, and our two other hiking guides. Joanne suddenly mentioned as we pulled away that sadly, we probably would never see any of them again. And it hit me – all the trekking we had done over the previous four days, the challenges we faced and the triumphs we achieved together as we climbed up and down mountains, and the laughs and meals we shared were in the past. We had spent less than 96 hours in the area, and even less than 24 hours in Dimaluo, but I had already grown a fondness for the people and the natural surrounding.

I stared out the window and tried to etch as much of the passing scenery into my mind as I could: bright, pastel buildings and wooden homes juxtaposed against layers of trees hidden behind clouds. Trucks shoveling dirt and people working hard along the roads. Mothers walking through narrow streets with their babies and chickens haphazardly crossing in front of moving vehicles. The van maneuvered around every obstacle and we swerved around cars and people alike as if we were in a video game. As I watched the outside world whiz by, I accepted that Joanne was right – we probably would never see Aluo or the people we had dinner with the night before ever again. And even if we had the chance to come back to the village, I realized it would be completely different.

The exact same day we left, the new road connecting the village to the city had opened, making the commute significantly shorter. What will happen to Dimaluo is something familiar to many villages in China: as more and more people have access to these villages, the more these villages will change. And it is only one road of many to be constructed in rural China.

The last day of the hike, Aluo told us about the rapid growth in the area. The new roads and concrete buildings would change the lives of the locals in uncertain ways. He believed that the people of the village and the ways they lived had something authentic about them and the construction and development occurring would most likely affect that. Change was already evident when we left, as trucks and mounds of dirt indicated the oncoming construction projects. Aluo hoped that perhaps both concrete buildings and the traditional wooden ones existing could be used once the changes were implemented. The answer to whether Aluo's wish will come true and whether the mountains we hiked and the villages we passed through will be recognizable in the future is something that we will have to wait to find out.
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Aluo, Goodbye

Christina Moon,Princeton Bridge Year: China 2016-17

Description

September 16th, 2016. As we left the guesthouse packed in two small vans, we waved our goodbyes to Aluo, his family, and our two other hiking guides. Joanne suddenly mentioned as we pulled away that sadly, we probably would never see any of them again. And it hit me – all the trekking we had […]

Posted On

09/29/16

Author

Christina Moon

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    [post_date] => 2016-09-29 12:17:28
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    [post_content] => Dear Dragons friends and family,

We have been in touch with the group, and they wrapped up a successful trek in the Cordillera Apolobamba on Tuesday.  They are now settled into a rural homestay in the village of Kaata, learning about medicinal plants and the way of life in this remote community.  This afternoon the group will participate in a goat sacrifice and aptapi (potluck meal) with community members, and this evening will observe a ceremony with a Kallawaya healer.

The group will travel by bus back to La Paz tomorrow, arriving in the evening, and will continue on to Cochabamba on Saturday to being their two-week homestay.  Student updates coming soon!

The attached photo was taken at the top of Akamani pass, the highest point of the trek!
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Homestay in Kaata

Julianne Chandler,FALL: Andes & Amazon B

Description

Dear Dragons friends and family, We have been in touch with the group, and they wrapped up a successful trek in the Cordillera Apolobamba on Tuesday.  They are now settled into a rural homestay in the village of Kaata, learning about medicinal plants and the way of life in this remote community.  This afternoon the […]

Posted On

09/29/16

Author

Julianne Chandler

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    [post_date] => 2016-09-29 07:34:56
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-29 13:34:56
    [post_content] => Dear Families and Friends,

About 36 hours ago we finished a beautiful trek around Apu Ausungate. We experienced 4 seasons of weather with snow, hail, rain, and sunshine greeting us at different times in the same day. Despite the challenges of some wintery camping, our group thrived. We asked students to rate the trek on a scale of 1-10: the lowest score was a 9.5 and the highest was a million (we are not great with "limits" when it comes to joy). As is usually true in life, even the unexpected had a silver lining that made any discomfort worthwhile. We camped under glaciers dusted with powder, climbed over 17,000 feet passes overlooking dramatic peaks contrasted with fresh snow, and even had a few brave souls very quickly dip into some icy lakes above 15,000 feet. We also learned that playing soccer above 15,000 feet is a humbling experience.

Today we leave for Nacion Q'eros for a second week of mountain time coupled with home-stays. We will be staying in stone huts with mostly Quechua speaking families as we hike in between villages largely disconnected from "modern" infrastructure and comforts. In that way, it is truly a privilege to share in an Andean way of life that has been preserved through centuries of change. We arrive with a desire to learn from the communities and appreciate our similarities and differences. Last night we read a transcript of Wade Davis' thought provoking TED talk on the threats facing indigenous cultures around the globe. As we step into communities under the evolving pressures of nationalization and globalization we will try to remember how unique it is to experience life in Q'eros at this moment in time.

We will be without reliable communication access (except for emergencies) until October 5th.

Hope all is well.

Aaron, Ellie, and Alan (the instructors)
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Off to Q’eros!

Instructors,FALL: Andes & Amazon A

Description

Dear Families and Friends, About 36 hours ago we finished a beautiful trek around Apu Ausungate. We experienced 4 seasons of weather with snow, hail, rain, and sunshine greeting us at different times in the same day. Despite the challenges of some wintery camping, our group thrived. We asked students to rate the trek on […]

Posted On

09/29/16

Author

Instructors

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    [post_date] => 2016-09-29 05:10:28
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-29 11:10:28
    [post_content] => 
     For any U.S. resident as inexperienced with international travel as myself, the thought of traveling to a foreign country such as Nicaragua evokes a diverse range of emotions: excitement, fear, eagerness, and not a bit of trepidation at the thought of being immersed in such an unfamiliar nation's language, food, and history. Such was my mindset when I arrived in Miami on September 15th and met my fellow Dragons group members for the first time. As we convened and prepared to board our flight to Managua, I could tell that many of my new travel companions shared my feelings -- each introductory conversation was punctuated repeatedly by statements such as "we're ACTUALLY going to Central America for three months" and "is this really happening?"
     This feeling of elated disbelief persisted as we arrived in Managua and made our way north to the community of La Garnacha, a farming association that produces coffee, bananas, and cheese, where we would spend our first week. We milked goats, played soccer with the locals, watched stunning sunsets, and began to work on our Spanish when we had the chance to do so, all the while attempting to internalize the thought we're in Nicaragua...we're in Nicaragua...we're in Nicaragua. We departed La Garnacha for the nearby city of Esteli (which afforded us an exciting  opportunity to explore some exotic big-city culture) where we prepared for the three-day, 22-kilometer trek to the farming community of El Largartillo, the location-to-be of our first homestays and intensive Spanish lessons.
     Trudging into El Lagartillo (minus Sarah and Lauren, who had become sick and traveled ahead from Esteli by car) on September 25th after three days of muddy, wet trekking, we were closer-knit as a group, eager to meet our homestay families, and overjoyed by the prospect of warm food and an opportunity to do laundry. After reuniting, we were introduced to our homestay mothers and fathers and began to explore the village and converse with the people whose homes we will be sharing for the next two weeks.
      The morning after our arrival in El Lagartillo the reality of our presence in Nicaragua hit home for many of us, taking the place of our wide-eyed international travelers' wonder. Our five new Spanish teachers began our first class with a striking presentation outlining the community's Contra-war era history, highlighting the death of 6 community members during an attack on the town by over 200 Contra soldiers in December 1984. Almost all residents of El Lagartillo are Sandinistas, like most Nicaraguans, and during the Contra war of the 80s the town was one of many farming communities targeted by Contra soldiers.
     One of these community members killed in the attack was the brother of my homestay father. Several others belonged to other families housing Dragons students during our stay in El Lagartillo. Hearing the pain and anger stirred by these deaths and by the conflict that prompted them lent a jarringly human face to a war that, for me, had never amounted to more than Wikipedia entries, old news stories, and U.S. history textbook passages. The conflict, the pain, and the death are suddenly very tangible. I suddenly feel just the slightest bit uncomfortable, knowing that I'm visiting Nicaragua as a citizen of the country that directly supported the Contras themselves and this led to deaths in the families with which we are living.
     We returned to our families after the presentation overwhelmed with questions: how do you feel about Ortega? How has access to public services changed over the years? Do you think it's okay for Ortega to have a shot at a third term? Is it difficult for you to house Americans, knowing their role in the years of conflict here? The answers to these question were consistent (for example, almost all Nicaraguans embrace Ortega as a symbol of stability) but just varied enough to paint a picture of Nicaragua's history, as well as its present state, as a melting pot of more perspectives, opinions and personal experiences than could possibly be accounted for. There is no central storyline here, but it is through asking questions such as these that I'm hoping to take steps towards wrapping my head around the wealth of narratives at play that have shaped this beautifully complex country in which we are traveling.
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Reflections

James Finn,FALL: Central America

Description

     For any U.S. resident as inexperienced with international travel as myself, the thought of traveling to a foreign country such as Nicaragua evokes a diverse range of emotions: excitement, fear, eagerness, and not a bit of trepidation at the thought of being immersed in such an unfamiliar nation’s language, food, and history. Such […]

Posted On

09/29/16

Author

James Finn

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    [post_date] => 2016-09-29 04:37:20
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Sara Van Horn
Lying feverish and immobile in bed is undoubtably a miserable experience.  The sounds of group laughter leaking through thin walls hurts just a little more than the pangs of my stomach or the spinning of my head.  Over the past few days, however, I've spent enough time staring at white walls to realize some of the perks of the experience.
For starters, I've had time to read and to think (and to write!).  Amid what has been a whirlwind of an experience so far, this comes as a small blessing.  I've had the time to repeat to myself, over and over, that "I'm in Nicaragua, I'm in Nicaragua," and I've almost started to believe it.
Over the past few days, I've been the recipient of a thousand verbal check-ins from my group members.  I've been able to realize the full extent of the compassion in this group.  Todos me cuidan.
I also feel well-versed in the Nicaraguan healthcare experience.  I've learned a handful of medical vocabulary - the word for thermometer, for antibiotics, for urine sample - as well as some larger ideas about state-funded healthcare - while I went to a "clinica privada", for example, all hospitals are public and free.  I learned that I can successfully hold a professional and exclusively anatomical conversation with a Spanish-speaking doctor.  I've learned to be thrilled at a 37* thermometer reading.
And while the landscape of Nicaragua is visually overwhelming, sometimes to the detriment of the other senses, while lying in bed, eyes closed, I'm able to recognize the two principle smells of Nica thus far: rain and cooking smoke.  I become aware of the tense relationship between roosters and dogs; I enjoy my host brother's playful drumming on pots and shampoo bottles; I futilely try to decipher the Spanish lyrics to Hotel California; I feel the full force of tin-roofed thunderstorms.  I notice smaller things too: the exact size of the hexagons in a mosquito net, how many holes in a Nicaraguan outlet, the shape of the leaves outside the window.
And perhaps most importantly, being sick has proved to be an extremely grounding experience.   Over the past few days, I have thought of little else besides the presence and feeling of my body in this room, this clinic, this roadside trail.  And this awareness has occupied me exclusively.  After a week of feeling the passive observer to the streaming days, my body has arrived here and my spirit soon follows.  Aside from the occasional midnight longings for my mother's teas, my father's patience, my brother's jokes, I do not think of home.
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FALL: Central America

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Time to Think

Sara Van Horn,FALL: Central America

Description

Sara Van Horn Lying feverish and immobile in bed is undoubtably a miserable experience.  The sounds of group laughter leaking through thin walls hurts just a little more than the pangs of my stomach or the spinning of my head.  Over the past few days, however, I’ve spent enough time staring at white walls to […]

Posted On

09/29/16

Author

Sara Van Horn

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Hi everyone!

I´m writing from Ocongate, Peru! We just got back from our first big trek around Mt. Ausungate yesterday and I wanted to share one of my favorite memories from the challenging but amazing trip. After four hard and full days of hiking up passes reaching elevations of 17,000 ft. and sleeping in tents that barely withstood the freezing rain and snow that pelted us throughout the night, we reached our final campsite next to a beautiful glacial lake. It looked like it was going to storm again so we set up our tents as quickly as we could. Tensions were running a little high because everyone was tired and cold and the last thing I wanted to do was leave my cozy sleeping bag to go make dinner. I put on every layer I had and two pairs of socks and shuffled over to the cooking tent where El and Taylor were already beginning preparations. We had originally planned on making some sort of chili and pasta but we realized that was no longer realistic in the moment. Aaron, Ellie, and Alan helped us to improvise and we came up with a lentil and pasta soup. Cooking for a large group of people with few supplies high in the mountains definitely made me appreciate how much more accessible and easy things are back at home, just like so many of the other experiences on this trip so far. Though our finished product was probably not something I would be too excited to get at a restaurant as the lentils were undercooked and the pasta was overcooked, the whole process was very therapeutic and it was something hot to fill our bellies with. By that point I was much warmer and my spirits were much higher. Taylor, El and I started to make our special dessert – chocolate fondue! Sole and Annika helped us to improvise a double boiler and it went very smoothly. We had hoped that this little dessert would make everyone happier and give them a little boost to get through the last cold night and it was exactly what we needed! Because the cooking tent was so small everyone had to come up to the stove and dip a wafer or animal cracker in one at a time. Every time someone came to the tent we would all cheer and laugh crazily as if someone had just scored a goal or delivered an amazing speech. We shared our dinner, dessert, and laughter with our incredible guides and the mule handlers and ended the night with our first and last campfire of the trip. With full bellies and smiles we retired to our tents to snuggle up in our sleeping bags. Though the trek challenged us all in different ways, I think I can speak for us all when I say that we learned a lot and had an incredible time!   I´m looking forward to our next adventure!

Sadie

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FALL: Andes & Amazon A

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Fondue in the mountains!

Sadie Housberg,FALL: Andes & Amazon A

Description

Hi everyone! I´m writing from Ocongate, Peru! We just got back from our first big trek around Mt. Ausungate yesterday and I wanted to share one of my favorite memories from the challenging but amazing trip. After four hard and full days of hiking up passes reaching elevations of 17,000 ft. and sleeping in tents […]

Posted On

09/28/16

Author

Sadie Housberg

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    [post_content] => Hey all!

I´ll start off by saying that everyone is healthy and happy. After trekking many hours at high altitude and sleeping though freezing cold wind and hail storms, I feel like I can do anything! At the top of the highest peak of the trip, and many of our lives, (17,200 ft.!!) I was flooded with emotions as I looked around at the beautiful scenery and thought about how much altitude we just gained. It was a truly beautiful moment that I am so happy I got to share with these amazing péople. Everyone was so supportive of each other and we spent our first trek struggling, laughing, cooking, eating, singing, and sleeping (or lack there of) together. The mountains, lakes and stars were unlike anything I´ve ever seen before. The Andes are such a sacred and spiritual place and all I felt was gratefulness that I could be part of it. Bathing in the hot springs at the end of the trek was one of the most relaxed I´ve ever felt. The food here has all been very healthy and delicious. I am falling more and more in love with Peru and am so excited for whats to come.

Later,

Maddie

P.S. To mom and dad: I´m thinking about you, I know you´d both love it here. Love and miss you!
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FALL: Andes & Amazon A

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post trek

Maddie Deering,FALL: Andes & Amazon A

Description

Hey all! I´ll start off by saying that everyone is healthy and happy. After trekking many hours at high altitude and sleeping though freezing cold wind and hail storms, I feel like I can do anything! At the top of the highest peak of the trip, and many of our lives, (17,200 ft.!!) I was […]

Posted On

09/28/16

Author

Maddie Deering

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    [post_date] => 2016-09-28 20:57:48
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-29 02:57:48
    [post_content] => 

 A week or so ago (although it feels like over a month ago!), we went to Urubamba town for the first time. Armed with only a sheet of paper detailing a scavenger hunt I was admittedly quite unclear on and some very rusty spanish skills I jumped off the bus and joined my designated group. El, Annika, Trisha and I were released into the small but bustling square and told to meet back in “dos horas”. It hit me fairly quickly that I had never had to use my spanish in a “real life” situation and that this all would be a lot more difficult than I had even anticipated.

 Our first mission was to find “choclos” in the market, although we didn't know what they were and also didn't know where the market was. We wandered down a street and I don't think my eyes have ever felt wider. The sounds, smells, people, animals and buildings were all starkly different from home and so fascinating. Fried dough bubbled in pans, tiny children walked around the streets as if they were independent adults going about their business and everywhere you looked people were selling their wares. After a couple awkward encounters, we located “El Mercado” (the market), and stepped inside the dimly lit, cavernous, underground space. The air was filled with the scent of raw meat and bits and pieces of cows and chickens layed on nearby tables. We continued to ask what “choclos” were but were mostly met with confused looks or claims that they would have them “mañana”. Eventually, we came to the conclusion that we had been asking people “what are corns?” (basically), so we decided to move on and inquire about the tourist industry in Urubamba.

 We approached a small stand where an older woman was selling various vegetables and asked. We later learned her name was Adela and that her daughter, a girl in her early twenties sitting slightly behind her, was named Lisette. In very clear spanish Lisette asked to see our paper and we handed it over. She proceeded to draw a detailed diagram of the province of Urubamba and the tourist attractions, including Machu Picchu, that surround it. She patiently explained that even though they were all located inside the Urubamba province, the town of Urubamba receives no money from them, and all of the money is sent to the city of Lima instead. She added that even the train that carries visitors to Machu Picchu is owned by a foreign company, and although it stops in Urubamba, the citizens receive no payment. Her mother, Adela, and her friend Gregoria jumped in adding that this was even more unfair because there are no public schools in town and since most families have many children, most can't afford to send them to school.

  We continued to talk to Lisette, Gregoria and Adela and I felt my fear for this new place melt away. I felt less that I was in a country foreign to me and more that I was simply connecting with human beings much like myself. They asked us each our names and what we wanted to study in the future. When they came to me, El helped me to say that I want to study “La derecha de Mujeres”, or Women's Rights. When I said this, their eyes all seemed to light up and Gregoria who had been focusing mostly on her work, lifted her head and looking into my eyes stated “Es muy importante.”

 We finished chatting and as we bid goodbye to our new friends, they hugged us and wished us luck in our travels. I no longer felt lost in this new place, and my heart was warm. [post_title] => New Friends [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => new-friends [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-09-28 20:57:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-09-29 02:57:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 583 [name] => FALL: Andes & Amazon A [slug] => andes-amazon-a-fall-2016 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 583 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 581 [count] => 59 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 [object_id] => 148875 [cat_ID] => 583 [category_count] => 59 [category_description] => [cat_name] => FALL: Andes & Amazon A [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-a-fall-2016 [category_parent] => 581 [link] => https://www.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2016/andes-amazon-a-fall-2016/ ) ) [category_links] => FALL: Andes & Amazon A )

FALL: Andes & Amazon A

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New Friends

Taylor Allen,FALL: Andes & Amazon A

Description

 A week or so ago (although it feels like over a month ago!), we went to Urubamba town for the first time. Armed with only a sheet of paper detailing a scavenger hunt I was admittedly quite unclear on and some very rusty spanish skills I jumped off the bus and joined my designated group. […]

Posted On

09/28/16

Author

Taylor Allen

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