Global Education Benchmark Group

Collaborative Faculty Travel Program in Indonesia

exclusively for GEBG member schools

Enroll
Duration
14 Days
Description

A skills-based training in international experiential education course leadership for teachers of global studies & world languages, and for coordinators of travel abroad & community-service programs.

Dates

Jun 15 - Jun 29, 2018


Suggested Ages

All Ages

Number of Participants

14


Availability

open

Begins In

30 Weeks

Tuition

$2,950


Estimated Flight Cost

$1,450

Program Overview

A challenging and profound journey for building skills in global education facilitation


This unique collaboration between GEBG and Where There Be Dragons offers participants a facilitated journey to communities and environments of profound difference. Along the way, we open up space for workshops and conversations focused on generating best practices in cross-cultural experiential education. This professional development seminar prepares educators who work with students in cross-cultural environments to run safer, more educational, and personally meaningful experiences for students.

Spanning from Malaysia to Australia, with over 17,000 equatorial islands, Indonesia hosts the world’s highest level of biodiversity and one of the richest cultural tapestries on earth.

We begin our training just outside of Yogyakarta (commonly known as “Jogja”) in the small village of Kedungmiri. Here we will focus on group container building, tone setting and orientation to the program. During this time we host workshops on conceptual frameworks for global education programming related…

This unique collaboration between GEBG and Where There Be Dragons offers participants a facilitated journey to communities and environments of profound difference. Along the way, we open up space for workshops and conversations focused on generating best practices in cross-cultural experiential education. This professional development seminar prepares educators who work with students in cross-cultural environments to run safer, more educational, and personally meaningful experiences for students.

Spanning from Malaysia to Australia, with over 17,000 equatorial islands, Indonesia hosts the world’s highest level of biodiversity and one of the richest cultural tapestries on earth.

We begin our training just outside of Yogyakarta (commonly known as “Jogja”) in the small village of Kedungmiri. Here we will focus on group container building, tone setting and orientation to the program. During this time we host workshops on conceptual frameworks for global education programming related to risk as growth, program and curriculum design, and container building for our own respective courses.

Moving into the city of Jogja, we spend four days living together in the cultural and artistic heart of Java. This dynamic center of cultural preservation and learning and the modern and ancient mingle on Jogja’s streets, which are home to a unique blend of Javanese, Hindu, and Islamic traditions allows to shift focus to the key themes for our program related to comparative religion, political process, and development studies. This is the “urban” portion of the course, and we will take advantage of the city’s offerings by exploring its bustling markets, Sultan’s palace, and religious centers. As we go, we step back to consider how to effectively organize similar activities with our own students, considering ways to manage risk, maximize learning, and empower students. In Jogja we also engage in discussions with community figures and organizations offering lessons that will provide scaffolding for understanding the spiritual, historical, and environmental complexity of Indonesia. Each day, we will also have introductory lessons in “Bahasa Indonesia,” one of the most accessible languages in Asia. The time devoted to learning language fundamentals will allow for greater connection to our home-stay in Masihulan.

From Jogja will embark on an expedition to the Wakatobi National Marine Park in the province of Southeast Sulawesi. Consisting of 5,400 square miles of sea, islands, and coral reefs, the park is one of Indonesia’s best attempts to protect its unparalleled marine habitats. The park is home to several communities of the Bajau People (sometimes referred to in English as “sea nomads”), who traditionally lived the majority of their lives on boats. In Sampela we learn firsthand about the unique lifestyle of the Bajau and their deep-rooted and inextricable connection to the ocean, and how that influences their syncretic practice of Islam. During our time in Sampela, we will create space for discussions and workshops related to rural home-stays, sustainable relationship building and best practices in global service learning, impact, and responsibility on our own global programming. We return to a costal community just outside of Jogja to focus on transference and course wrap up.

Have questions? Please contact Joe Vogel jvogel@hb.edu, President of the GEBG, or Simon Hart, Director of School Partnerships simon@wheretherebedragons.com

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PARTICIPANTS

GEBG_LogoParticipants on this course will be drawn from the faculty of GEBG member schools who are involved in the design and facilitation of experiential global education programming at home and abroad. Participants are required to apply and are screened through a comprehensive admissions process before being accepted. Everyone on this program is expected to willingly engage their learning edge by pushing their physical, emotional, and intellectual comfort zones, engage in authentic and meaningful exchange within the group, and embrace the inherent ambiguity of travel and cross-cultural engagement in a foreign environment.

 

TRAINING MODULES

  • Risk Management: How to identify, assess, and manage risks abroad; working with students to manage risk in the field; the student-container – check-ins, documentation, and student management.
  • Community Engagement: How to build sustainable relationships with host communities; facilitating a homestays safely; organizing a student excursion; setting up a successful service learning project.
  • Course and Curriculum Design: Identifying student learning outcomes, utilizing backwards design and an intentional progression of student experiences and activities. Identifying and separating program components and developing curriculum for each component.
  • Cross-Cultural Facilitation: How to deepen the student experience through intentional facilitation; teaching to global leadership and awareness; working with a progression that allows students to fail forward; bookending your program – tone-setting an experience and integrating a program into the rest of a students’ life; ethnocentrism and cultural awareness.

CENTRAL THEMES

  • Ethnic Minority Peoples and Cultural Traditions: How does a nation as diverse and disparate as Indonesia incorporate the myriad ethnic identities and political agenda of its populace? What are the current trends in culture loss and continuity?
  • Comparative Religion: Indonesia is the world’s largest majority muslim country. How does Indonesia represent religious pluralism in an Islam majority country? How do the institutions of Islam and Democracy coincide?
  • Cultural and Environmental Conservation: How do different ethnic groups interact with the natural environment? What implications does this hold for global environmental issues?
  • Gender and Development: What is the role of women in community-based development initiatives and strategies? How do communities strive to improve education, health and infrastructure on a day-to-day level?

Have questions? Please contact Joe Vogel jvogel@hb.edu, President of the GEBG, or Simon Hart, Director of School Partnerships simon@wheretherebedragons.com